Certain class action settlements—like employment and consumer settlements—will very often draw objections from absent class members. But other types of settlements with more sophisticated absent class members—like antitrust and securities—will often draw no objections at all.

Without any objectors, and thus no one contesting approval of the settlement, a district judge with busy docket will

In a recent published decision, the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit clarified the standards that district courts must apply when certifying discrete issues–rather than an entire action–for classwide adjudication under Rule 23(c)(4).

What Is Rule 23(c)(4)?

Rule 23(c)(4) is an obscure part of federal class action practice. It states, simply,

On Sept. 23, the Delaware Supreme Court endorsed a new universal three-part demand-futility test in United Food and Commercial Workers Union and Participating Food Industry Employers Tri-State Pension Fund v. Zuckerberg, et al. (Zuckerberg).[1] This universal test combines the traditional demand-futility tests established in Aronson v. Lewis[2] and Rales v. Blasband

Today, the United States Supreme Court resolved a circuit split regarding what constitutes an “autodialer” under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA). In a blow to the plaintiffs’ bar, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of defendant Facebook, establishing a narrower, nationwide standard for what type of dialing equipment constitutes an “autodialer.”

The TCPA prohibits