On Sept. 23, the Delaware Supreme Court endorsed a new universal three-part demand-futility test in United Food and Commercial Workers Union and Participating Food Industry Employers Tri-State Pension Fund v. Zuckerberg, et al. (Zuckerberg).[1] This universal test combines the traditional demand-futility tests established in Aronson v. Lewis[2] and Rales v. Blasband

Today, the United States Supreme Court resolved a circuit split regarding what constitutes an “autodialer” under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA). In a blow to the plaintiffs’ bar, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of defendant Facebook, establishing a narrower, nationwide standard for what type of dialing equipment constitutes an “autodialer.”

The TCPA prohibits

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments on March 30, 2021, in a case that will help clarify when an intangible, nonmonetary injury is sufficiently “concrete and particularized” to give rise to Article III standing.1 The Supreme Court’s decision will likely provide guidance for class-action plaintiffs seeking to bring (and class-action defendants looking to

On February 16, Judge Furman of the Southern District of New York handed down a ruling in In re Citibank August 11, 2020 Wire Transfers concluding that Citibank could not recover $900 million inadvertently wired to lenders.

The entire 105-page decision[1] is a fascinating read, describing a near-perfect storm of convoluted financial arrangements, technological

Earlier this month, the Eleventh Circuit, in Tsao v. Captiva MVP Restaurant Partners, LLC, No. 18-14959, 2021 WL 381948 (11th Cir. Feb. 4, 2021), affirmed the dismissal of a class-action lawsuit brought on behalf of patrons of a restaurant chain, holding that data breach victims must show more than a heightened risk of future

Last March, The New York Times reported that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had been “quietly making overtures” to older Republican-nominated judges to encourage them to retire so that then-President Trump could fill their vacancies before the end of his term. After the 2020 presidential election, the Los Angeles Times reported that, reciprocally, some federal

In the wake of the Great Financial Crisis, global financial markets got their first experience of negative interest rates, something classical economists had long thought to be unworkable if not impossible. On April 20, concerns surrounding the effects of the COVID-19 crisis introduced investors to another negative first: crude oil prices.

On July 9, investors

In the most recent development in Cohen v. Capital One Funding LLC [1], a case seeking to certify a class asserting that New York State’s usury laws can apply to securitized credit card debts, Capital One-affiliated defendants have prevailed in their efforts to have the claims dismissed.  Plaintiffs sought to apply New York’s statutory caps

Last week, Judge Naomi Buchwald of the Southern District of New York provided final approval of a nearly $22 million settlement between a class of indirect investors and five Wall Street banks that the plaintiff investors accused of manipulating the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) in violation of the Sherman Act. The plaintiffs are over-the-counter

In a previous post, we discussed Kirschner v. JPMorgan Chase Bank,[1] an action in which the trustee of bankrupt Millennium Labs brought state law securities fraud claims on behalf of a group of “approximately 400 mutual funds, pension funds, universities, [CLO]s and other institutional investors,” against banks that organized a $1.765 billion syndicated