In the wake of COVID-19, litigants have increasingly sought to excuse contractual performance by invoking force majeure clauses. In the early stages of the pandemic, there were few reported decisions on these matters, and the substance of these rulings echoed the principles that were applied in the pre-COVID era: force majeure clauses are strictly and

Today, the United States Supreme Court resolved a circuit split regarding what constitutes an “autodialer” under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA). In a blow to the plaintiffs’ bar, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of defendant Facebook, establishing a narrower, nationwide standard for what type of dialing equipment constitutes an “autodialer.”

The TCPA prohibits

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments on March 30, 2021, in a case that will help clarify when an intangible, nonmonetary injury is sufficiently “concrete and particularized” to give rise to Article III standing.1 The Supreme Court’s decision will likely provide guidance for class-action plaintiffs seeking to bring (and class-action defendants looking to

As financial services firms increasingly turn to artificial intelligence (AI), banking regulators warn that despite their astonishing capabilities, these tools must be relied upon with caution.

Last week, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve (the Fed) held a virtual AI Academic Symposium to explore the application of AI in the financial services industry.

In the wake of the Great Financial Crisis, global financial markets got their first experience of negative interest rates, something classical economists had long thought to be unworkable if not impossible. On April 20, concerns surrounding the effects of the COVID-19 crisis introduced investors to another negative first: crude oil prices.

On July 9, investors

In a previous post, we discussed Kirschner v. JPMorgan Chase Bank,[1] an action in which the trustee of bankrupt Millennium Labs brought state law securities fraud claims on behalf of a group of “approximately 400 mutual funds, pension funds, universities, [CLO]s and other institutional investors,” against banks that organized a $1.765 billion syndicated

As cross-border business continues to grow, litigation too is increasingly crossing borders. In a recent decision addressing several issues of first impression, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit opted to aid international litigants, interpreting Section 1782 of Chapter 28 of the United States Code to allow discovery in aid of foreign proceedings

Consumer lending as we know it today – and credit card lending in particular – depend on securitization for significant access to capital. However, the ability of banks to bundle and sell credit card debt-backed securities may be thrown into disarray depending on the outcomes of a pair of pending cases: Cohen v. Capital One

In a case pending in federal court in New York, Kirschner v. JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., No. 17-cv-06334-PGG (S.D.N.Y.), a bankruptcy trustee may upend what has long been accepted wisdom on Wall Street: securities laws apply to stocks, bonds, equity options, and the like – but not to syndicated loans.

Kirschner is brought by the